These are the fundamental grammar structures, which you must use on your IELTS exam to achieve 7 or higher in Grammar.


#471

Not only ... but also


Use Not only ... but also for parallelism (two or more phrases or clauses in a sentence that have the same grammatical structure).

The words following both parts of this correlative conjunction should belong to the same parts of speech (after 'not only' and after 'but also'). 

Note that there are an inversion when we use Not only ... but also with verbs: after 'not only' always put a verb.

Using comma with Not only ... but also

There are not strict rules her. A comma before 'but also' is not necessary, but if you want to show special emphasis, you can add a comma.


Examples with 'Not only ... but also'

Not only was it raining all day at the concert but also the band was late.

I identified with Ted not only as an actor but also as a person.

Not only did she forget my birthday, but she also didn’t even apologise for that.

She is not only intelligent, but also beautiful.



Grammar
#475

Passive voice


In the passive voice, the person or thing receiving the action becomes the subject. The accent is on the person or object that experiences an action rather than on the person or object that performs the action. 

Construction: 'to be' + 'verb in past participle (3rd form)'.


Examples with 'Passive voice'

More research needs to be done before choosing a certain action. 

Several conclusions can be drawn from the results.

My first smartphone was stolen in a supermarket.

I noticed that a pocket had been left open.

 



Grammar
#472

Second Conditional


Second conditional structure: If-clause (past simple) + main-clause (present simple with an auxiliary modal verb).  Auxiliary modal verbs: could, should, would, might, etc.

Second conditional sentences are useful for expressing outcomes that are completely unrealistic.

Using a comma in Second Conditional sentences

When the if-clause precedes the main-clause (if-clause + main-clause), put a comma after the if-clause.

When the main-clause precedes the if-clause (main-clause + if-clause), do not put a comma after the if-clause.

 

 


Examples with 'Second Conditional'

If I were you, I wouldn't break with her.

If it showered, you would get wet.

Without a helmet, he would hurt himself if he fell.

Ifpossessed a billion dollars, I might travel overseas every weekend.

 



Grammar
#473

Third Conditional


Third Conditional structure: If-clause (past perfect) + main-clause (auxiliary modal verb + have + past participle).  Auxiliary modal verbs: could, should, would, might, etc.

Third Conditional sentences are useful to describe a situation that didn't happen and to imagine the result of this situation.

Using a comma in Third Conditional sentences

When the if-clause precedes the main-clause (if-clause + main-clause), put a comma after the if-clause.

When the main-clause precedes the if-clause (main-clause + if-clause), do not put a comma after the if-clause.


Examples with 'Third Conditional'

If she had studied with IELTS777, she would have passed the exam with 7+ scores. (but she did not know about IELTS777, and failed the exam)

If they’d told me, I might have been able to help. (but they didn't tell me, so I didn't help them)

We wouldn’t have missed the plane if we hadn’t wasted time in the cafe. (but we were in the cafe for a long time, and therefore we missed this plane)

If he had gone to bed earlier, he wouldn't have been so tired. (but he is tired because he went to bed at 2 am)



Grammar
#474

Used to


Use Used to + verb for talking about states or actions that were true or happened in the past, but are not true or do not happen now.


Examples with 'Used to'

He used to smoke, but then he realized that it's unhealthy.

I used to play the guitar every day, but now I literally have no time for this.

I didn’t use to wear suits, but now I really like it.

We used to watch that TV-shows every single day. 



Grammar